POST_ is a new audio work commissioned by Saolta Arts in partnership with Saolta University Health Care Group and Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture, part of a programme of new works called The Deepest Shade of Green that explores connecting hospitals with the world outside, and the importance of listening to and learning from those who use them.

Made for, with, and about the hospital community, The Deepest Shade of Green creates spaces for a diversity of voices to be heard by one another.

 

  1. Research on residency at the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL) in 2017, began for Deirdre O'Mahony with the proposition, is 'carbon-neutral' beef possible? Scientists are currently testing the effect of different kinds of forage such as Sainfoin, on animal and soil health and on levels of methane produced by livestock. This art film project, supported by the Wellcome Trust investigated historical references to forages like Sainfoin in the museum archives and reviewed some of the extensive collection of documentary films produced to teach and promote increased efficiency in agriculture
  2. THE PERSISTENT RETURN 2018, exhibited at VISUAL Carlow and the Museum of Natural History, Leeuwarden The 2-screen installation resulted from years of research and projects focusing on the global and local political implications of the potato. The film points to the human cost of privileging scientific rationalism at the expense of tacit knowledge, a reminder that the skills of both head and hand are needed in order to actively respond to the challenges presented by climate change today.
  3. Trial + Error was a short documentary film and photographic archive installation held as part of a year-long programme curated for Leeuwarden Capital of Culture by Dutch potato farmers. It told the story of JJ Silke, who transformed a small parish in County Donegal from subsistence farming to a thriving seed potato industry with a world record yield of Arran Banner potatoes in the 1940s, and collapsed in the early 1960s. Fr. John Silke, published a book about his father’s role and the industry in 2012.
  4. Forest Culture: Tangled web focused on the woodlands in the vicinity of Lismore and their importance to the wider context of the town and region. The project began with a series of walks led by experts on aspects of the human, natural and cultural history of each forest visited. Participants used their observations and foraged material evidence to map the human and non-human traces encountered in the different forests. Workshops in St Carthage Hall took place in January and February to process information in a variety of ways, collaborating on an exhibition that reflected on the complex relationship between people and forests in the locale and beyond.
  5. The SPUD book marks a decade since SPUD’s initial conversations about the best way to grow potatoes in North County Clare. The potato is the seed at the centre of this ever-fruitful project and the subject that offers infinite trajectories- engaging conversations worldwide to interact with dialogues from the past. This publication encompasses the ten years of SPUD, its 11 projects from 2009 to 2019, with an essay titled ‘Honour, humanity, hunger and policies of extermination’ by Catherine Marshall, text developed in conversation between Deirdre O’Mahony and Sinead Phelan and design by Cian Brennan. The limited edition of 300 copies will cost €25 including P[ampersand]P

Forest Culture installation

Forest Culture: Tangled web focused on the woodlands in the vicinity of Lismore and their importance to the wider context of the town and region. The project began in November 2019 with a series of walks led by experts on aspects of the human, natural and cultural history of each forest visited. Participants used their observations and foraged material evidence to map the human and non-human traces encountered in the different forests. Workshops in St Carthage Hall took place in January and February to process information in a variety of ways. Participants collaborated in the installation about the complex relationship between people and forests in the locale and beyond. More 

 

 

 

 

The Killinaboy Mapping Group, the first club to form at X-PO in 2007, launched their new website during the live broadcast of Tom Flannagan's Folk Radio project at X-PO. Colin Murray of the Heritage Council interviewed Francis Whelan and Sean Whelan about the project and website. Link HERE